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  1. If you are on SSD you'd most likely qualify for the rebate, but will have to file a 2007 tax return to...

    1 Answers · Business & Finance · 22/02/2008

  2. ... $25K ($32K if MFJ) does any part of your SSD become taxable. Consequently, if you have no income other than your SSD ...

    4 Answers · Business & Finance · 08/03/2008

  3. ... are eligible for a $300 rebate if you received at least $3000 in SSD in 2007. BUT YOU MUST FILE TO RECEIVE...

    5 Answers · Business & Finance · 22/03/2008

  4. ... income. Neither your supplemental benefit nor your SSD are subject to SS taxes. Unless you work again for...

    2 Answers · Business & Finance · 09/02/2008

  5. ... husband have to file your own tax return and pay tax on your SSD as well as your husband's earned income.

    5 Answers · Business & Finance · 08/01/2013

  6. ... your question? Will your SSI and son's SSD be affected by what? Why is y our son also ...

    4 Answers · Business & Finance · 29/05/2013

  7. If that is your only income (and receiving SSD would suggest you have no earned income) you do not qualify for EIC. ...

    5 Answers · Business & Finance · 21/01/2007

  8. ...some cases the cost reconstruction is far greater than any future SSD benefits you would be able to recover. It may be sad but you are...

    4 Answers · Business & Finance · 22/05/2009

  9. If you file jointly, you do have to include his income. Since your total income is greater than $32,000, part of his SSDI will be taxable. However, your tax liability should be less than if you filed separately.

    2 Answers · Business & Finance · 30/01/2012

  10. Education credits or deductions can reduce your tax liability but they can not, by themselves, create a refund so, if your tax liability is already zero, there is no reason to file. You would not receive a refund.

    1 Answers · Business & Finance · 28/02/2009

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