Yahoo Web Search

  1. a =pie r^2 a =3.14 (5^2) a =3.14 (25) a = 78.5 this is the area of the whole circle which is 360, but you only want a 30 degree section so 360/30=12 you only want 1/12 of the area a = 78.5/12 a = 6.54

    2 Answers · Education & Reference · 22/10/2008

  2. Make a proportion: arc length / full circumference = sector area / area of whole circle 12/ (2πr) = 50 / (π r^2) cross multiply 100πr = 12πr^2 divide by πr 100 = 12r...

    2 Answers · Education & Reference · 20/02/2011

  3. Area of a Sector = Central Angle/360 deg]( Area of Circle ) Area of a Sector = (Central Ange/360 deg)(pi)(r^2) Area of a Sector ...

    2 Answers · Education & Reference · 12/07/2009

  4. Remember area of a circle ( A ) = pi times radius squared. A = pi r^2 That...by the 'degree fraction'. A = pi 7^2 A = 49 pi Sect( A ) = 49 pi x 35/360 Cancel down by '5' Sect( A ) 49...

    1 Answers · Education & Reference · 27/02/2013

  5. Area of complete circle pi*r^2 That includes an angle of 2*pi radians at the...

    1 Answers · Education & Reference · 19/08/2012

  6. ...inside of a circle . The diagonal of the square is also the diameter of the circle . Finding the Area of a Sector Find out how big the sector is in terms of degrees...

    12 Answers · Education & Reference · 09/11/2009

  7. Hi K L = ]], A sector is basically a portion of a circle . In your case, the sector takes up 1/4 of the area of the circle , meaning it occupies a quarter of the circle . Because...

    1 Answers · Education & Reference · 16/10/2011

  8. A = (315/360)πr² A = (315/360)π(2.5)² A = 17.18 ft² m02142014

    1 Answers · Education & Reference · 20/02/2014

  9. ...2)*(arc length)*(radius) .. radius = 2*( sector area )/(arc length) ... <...calculus, you find that the analogy with a triangle actually holds up. Consider, for example, the area of the entire circle is π*r^2 = (1/2)*(2πr...

    2 Answers · Education & Reference · 18/01/2013

  10. Sector Area in degrees = (degrees)/360 * 3...r^2 but you need to know the degrees of the angle! length of an arc = degrees...size of the angle at the center of your circle !

    2 Answers · Education & Reference · 14/06/2012

  1. Try asking your question on Yahoo Answers