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  1. ...astronaut or loose object or whatever moving around in the ISS is part of the mass that makes up the ISS ...and they pretty much cancel each other out, leaving the ISS on the same orbit as if nobody had moved.

    1 Answers · Science & Mathematics · 21/02/2010

  2. ...and other small equipment is very small compared to the mass of the ISS ; Therefore the movement of the ISS is negligible. (It...

    7 Answers · Science & Mathematics · 19/09/2006

  3. ... the thing it is orbiting. That goes for the ISS and anything inside it. Because gravity accelerates all things...

    1 Answers · Science & Mathematics · 30/07/2008

  4. .... So if all you have is this room and the rest of the ISS , then yes the momentum would be separated and it would spin (or tumble, or some...

    2 Answers · Science & Mathematics · 05/02/2011

  5. ...of sound. On the one hand, the drag of the cable would be causing the ISS to lose energy and to drift down and re-enter the atmosphere. On the other hand, the...

    1 Answers · Science & Mathematics · 22/12/2011

  6. ... get really serious about long term space travel. There's more about ISS research at the NASA web site: https://www.nasa.gov/mission...

    2 Answers · Science & Mathematics · 20/06/2020

  7. ...to pass on the Earth in the stronger gravity field than it would on ISS in the weaker field where the beam doesn't bend as much and so travels...

    4 Answers · Science & Mathematics · 06/12/2017

  8. ...39;things' that it can stick to, like iron, in space as well. Are ISS walls made of iron - if so it would stick. I think most '...

    2 Answers · Science & Mathematics · 04/12/2012

  9. Because nothing rests in space. if you apply a slight force on an object, it will be applied and keep that object in motion. Sometimes it's unpredictable and can cause undesired spin or velocity. You dont want to fly rapidly towards something and then accidentally put it into a spin or bounce off it...

    1 Answers · Science & Mathematics · 01/06/2011

  10. a = M G / r^2 M G = g R^2 a = g (R / r)^2 a = 9.8*(6371 / 6701)^2 = 8.86 m/s^2

    1 Answers · Science & Mathematics · 07/11/2017

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